Deliberate practice done consistently over time improves performance

RESEARCH

CANDIDA

 

Did you know that 3.1 million Americans suffer from constipation? Are you one of the 20% of the U.S. population who have been diagnosed with acid reflux or one of the 2.1 million people diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)? Have you ever taken an antibiotic? Do you tend to have cravings for carbohydrates, sugars, or anything starchy? Do you feel fatigued or sluggish?

These are some common problems caused by candidiasis, also known as yeast or candida overgrowth, and until you solve the underlying cause of your symptoms by eliminating the yeast, the symptoms won’t go away. Also keep in mind that candida symptoms are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract.

Candida Symptoms

  • bloating
  • belching
  • excessive gas
  • constipation
  • heartburn
  • cramps
  • pain
  • indigestion
  • diarrhea

Candida overgrowth, or yeast overgrowth, can also cause:

  • headaches
  • fatigue
  • skin rashes
  • immune suppression
  • chemical sensitivity
  • muscle aches
  • hives
  • fungal infections under fingernails and toenails
  • vaginal yeast infections
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • joint pain
  • inability to concentrate
  • athlete’s foot
  • thrush, a white coating on the tongue
  •   

Even worse, yeast produces toxins that depress your immune system, making you more reactive to allergies and more susceptible to infections. Wouldn’t you like to know what is causing your symptoms so that you can get rid of them permanently?

What Causes Candida Overgrowth

If this sounds familiar, you may have candidiasis, better known as yeast or candida overgrowth. If you have ever taken an antibiotic, eaten antibiotic-injected meat or dairy products, taken birth control pills, or steroids then you are susceptible to candida overgrowth and its varied symptoms.

Antibiotics destroy good bacteria along with the bad, leaving us defenseless and open to more infection in the future. Unfortunately, antibiotics do not kill yeast, so the playing field is never leveled, but rather the yeast is allowed to proliferate in the digestive tract and vagina. Toxins released by yeast enter the bloodstream and impair immunity, making you more reactive to allergies and more susceptible to infections. Weakened immunity contributes to recurrent infections, leading to frequent antibiotic use, thus perpetuating the cycle. This vicious cycle is hard to break. So what can you do to put an end to this process?


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RESEARCH

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ADRENAL FATIGUE

  

Stressed out? Always tired? You Might Have Adrenal Fatigue.
Are you exhausted? Do you drag yourself out of bed in the morning and down a cup of coffee just to get up and going? Do you fight fatigue throughout the day? Does the slightest bit of stress send you over the edge? Do you suffer from muscle and/or joint pain, recurrent infections, allergies, anxiety or panic attacks, depression, or low blood sugar or blood pressure? Have you been told that you have chronic fatigue syndrome?

Adrenal fatigue is a common health problem that Americans face today. Unfortunately, most are unaware that this could be the cause of their symptoms because their doctor never brought it up as a possibility. Like hypothyroidism, it is a common condition that is overlooked by traditional medicine, and many doctors deny that adrenal fatigue is even a real condition, however we know better.


What is Adrenal Fatigue?
Adrenal fatigue occurs when the adrenal glands cannot produce enough cortisol to meet the demands of your body. In short, you are wearing your adrenal glands out, so you feel increasingly fatigued, stressed, anxious, and many other health conditions may occur as a result.


Adrenal Fatigue Symptoms

  • Severe fatigue – the number one symptom of adrenal fatigue
  • Anxiety or panic attacks
  • Hair loss
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness upon standing
  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)
  • Heart palpitations
  • Difficulty “bouncing back” from stress
  • Recurrent infections
  • Allergies and/or asthma
  • Irregular menstrual cycles
  • Infertility
  • Low libido
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  • Cold and heat intolerance
  • Depression
  • Headaches


 

With adrenal fatigue, you are likely to be more vulnerable to infections and to heal more slowly than those with healthy adrenal glands.

Causes of Adrenal Fatigue
Chronic, unrelenting stress, whether physical or psychological or both, eventually leads to adrenal fatigue. It can also occur after acute or chronic infections such as the flu, bronchitis or pneumonia. In today’s fast-paced world, the stress that many people experience on a daily, ongoing basis is a contributing factor. Stressors may include noise, pollution, traffic, inclement weather, injuries, illnesses, emotional conflicts, deadlines and inadequate sleep.

H

ALLERGIES

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Over 60 million Americans suffer from allergies and the number is growing. Asthma accounts for approximately 10.1 million missed work days for adults annually.

Allergies are the 6th leading cause of chronic disease in the United States, costing the health care system $18 billion annually.

Are allergies and asthma making you feel miserable?
Allergies and asthma can cause so many annoying symptoms, but are they also making you sick? Are you unable to go outside without an inhaler? Do you get sinus infections several times a year? Do you spend a good portion of your time not feeling well and miss a lot of work? If you can track your symptoms on the seasonal calendar you may be one of the many suffering from allergies.

Common Allergy Symptoms

  • Fatigue
  • Frequent headaches
  • Sneezing, post nasal drainage or itching of the nose
  • Frequent “colds”
  • Recurrent or chronic sinus infections
  • Recurrent yeast infections, jock itch or athlete’s foot
  • Dizziness
  • Itching, watering, redness or swelling of the eyes
  • Dark circles under the eyes
  • Recurrent ear infections
  • Recurrent cough or bronchitis
  • Tightness in the chest, wheezing or asthma
  • Eczema, skin rashes, itching or hives
  • Indigestion, bloating, diarrhea or constipation

Consider the following questions to find out if you would benefit from allergy treatment:

  • Do your symptoms worsen during a particular season, such as the spring or fall?
  • Do your symptoms change when you go indoors or outdoors?
  • Are your symptoms worse in parks or grassy areas?
  • Are your symptoms worse in the bedroom after going to bed, or in the morning upon arising?
  • Do you awaken in the middle of the night with congestion?
  • Are your symptoms worse when you come into contact with dust?
  • Are your symptoms worse around animals?
  • Do you have any blood relatives with allergies?
  • Do you have mood swings or feel depressed for no reason?
  • Do you have recurrent yeast infections, jock itch, athlete’s foot, or fungus under your toenails?
  • Do you develop symptoms after eating or drinking certain foods?
  • Do you sometimes feel stimulated, hyperactive or fatigued after meals?
  • Do you have a crease across the bridge of your nose?


Overview

Allergies occur when your immune system reacts to a foreign substance — such as pollen, bee venom or pet dander — or a food that doesn't cause a reaction in most people.

Your immune system produces substances known as antibodies. When you have allergies, your immune system makes antibodies that identify a particular allergen as harmful, even though it isn't. When you come into contact with the allergen, your immune system's reaction can inflame your skin, sinuses, airways or digestive system.

The severity of allergies varies from person to person and can range from minor irritation to anaphylaxis — a potentially life-threatening emergency. While most allergies can't be cured, treatments can help relieve your allergy symptoms.

Symptoms

Allergy symptoms, which depend on the substance involved, can affect your airways, sinuses and nasal passages, skin, and digestive system. Allergic reactions can range from mild to severe. In some severe cases, allergies can trigger a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis.

Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, can cause:

  • Sneezing
  • Itching of the nose, eyes or roof of the mouth
  • Runny, stuffy nose
  • Watery, red or swollen eyes (conjunctivitis)

A food allergy can cause:

  • Tingling in the mouth
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue, face or throat
  • Hives
  • Anaphylaxis

An insect sting allergy can cause:

  • A large area of swelling (edema) at the sting site
  • Itching or hives all over the body
  • Cough, chest tightness, wheezing or shortness of breath
  • Anaphylaxis

A drug allergy can cause:

  • Hives
  • Itchy skin
  • Rash
  • Facial swelling
  • Wheezing
  • Anaphylaxis

Atopic dermatitis, an allergic skin condition also called eczema, can cause skin to:

  • Itch
  • Redden
  • Flake or peel

Anaphylaxis

Some types of allergies, including allergies to foods and insect stings, can trigger a severe reaction known as anaphylaxis. A life-threatening medical emergency, anaphylaxis can cause you to go into shock. Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • A drop in blood pressure
  • Severe shortness of breath
  • Skin rash
  • Lightheadedness
  • A rapid, weak pulse
  • Nausea and vomiting

When to see a doctor

You might see a doctor if you have symptoms you think are caused by an allergy, and over-the-counter allergy medications don't provide enough relief. If you have symptoms after starting a new medication, call the doctor who prescribed it right away.

For a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis), call 911 or your local emergency number or seek emergency medical help. If you carry an epinephrine auto-injector (Auvi-Q, EpiPen, others), give yourself a shot right away.

Even if your symptoms improve after an epinephrine injection, you should go to the emergency department to make sure symptoms don't return when the effects of the injection wear off.

If you've had a severe allergy attack or any signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis in the past, make an appointment to see your doctor. Evaluation, diagnosis and long-term management of anaphylaxis are complicated, so you'll probably need to see a doctor who specializes in allergies and immunology.

Causes

An allergy starts when your immune system mistakes a normally harmless substance for a dangerous invader. The immune system then produces antibodies that remain on the alert for that particular allergen. When you're exposed to the allergen again, these antibodies can release a number of immune system chemicals, such as histamine, that cause allergy symptoms.

Common allergy triggers include:

  • Airborne allergens, such as pollen, animal dander, dust mites and mold
  • Certain foods, particularly peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, eggs and milk
  • Insect stings, such as from a bee or wasp
  • Medications, particularly penicillin or penicillin-based antibiotics
  • Latex or other substances you touch, which can cause allergic skin reactions

Risk factors

You might be more likely to develop an allergy if you:

  • Have a family history of asthma or allergies, such as hay fever, hives or eczema
  • Are a child
  • Have asthma or another allergic condition

Complications

Having an allergy increases your risk of certain other medical problems, including:

  • Anaphylaxis. If you have severe allergies, you're at increased risk of this serious allergy-induced reaction. Foods, medications and insect stings are the most common triggers of anaphylaxis.
  • Asthma. If you have an allergy, you're more likely to have asthma — an immune system reaction that affects the airways and breathing. In many cases, asthma is triggered by exposure to an allergen in the environment (allergy-induced asthma).
  • Sinusitis and infections of the ears or lungs. Your risk of getting these conditions is higher if you have hay fever or asthma.

Prevention

Preventing allergic reactions depends on the type of allergy you have. General measures include the following:

  • Avoid known triggers. Even if you're treating your allergy symptoms, try to avoid triggers. If, for instance, you're allergic to pollen, stay inside with windows and doors closed when pollen is high. If you're allergic to dust mites, dust and vacuum and wash bedding often.
  • Keep a diary. When trying to identify what causes or worsens your allergic symptoms, track your activities and what you eat, when symptoms occur and what seems to help. This may help you and your doctor identify triggers.
  • Wear a medical alert bracelet. If you've had a severe allergic reaction, a medical alert bracelet (or necklace) lets others know that you have a serious allergy in case you have a reaction and you're unable to communicate.

Diagnosis

To evaluate whether you have an allergy, your doctor will likely:

  • Ask detailed questions about signs and symptoms
  • Perform a physical exam
  • Have you keep a detailed diary of symptoms and possible triggers

If you have a food allergy, your doctor will likely:

  • Ask you to keep a detailed diary of the foods you eat
  • Ask if you've stopped eating the suspected food during the allergy evaluation

Your doctor might also recommend one or both of the following tests. However, be aware that these allergy tests can be falsely positive or falsely negative.

  • Skin test. A doctor or nurse will prick your skin and expose you to small amounts of the proteins found in potential allergens. If you're allergic, you'll likely develop a raised bump (hive) at the test location on your skin.
  • Blood test. Specific IgE (sIgE) blood testing, commonly called radioallergosorbent test (RAST) or ImmunoCAP testing, measures the amount of allergy-causing antibodies in your bloodstream, known as immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. A blood sample is sent to a medical laboratory, where it can be tested for evidence of sensitivity to possible allergens.

If your doctor suspects your problems are caused by something other than an allergy, other tests might help identify — or rule out — other medical problems.

Treatment

Allergy treatments include:

  • Allergen avoidance. Your doctor will help you take steps to identify and avoid your allergy triggers. This is generally the most important step in preventing allergic reactions and reducing symptoms.
  • Medications. Depending on your allergy, medications can help reduce your immune system reaction and ease symptoms. Your doctor might suggest over-the-counter or prescription medication in the form of pills or liquid, nasal sprays, or eyedrops.
  • Immunotherapy. For severe allergies or allergies not completely relieved by other treatment, your doctor might recommend allergen immunotherapy. This treatment involves a series of injections of purified allergen extracts, usually given over a period of a few years.
    Another form of immunotherapy is a tablet that's placed under the tongue (sublingual) until it dissolves. Sublingual drugs are used to treat some pollen allergies.
  • Emergency epinephrine. If you have a severe allergy, you might need to carry an emergency epinephrine shot at all times. Given for severe allergic reactions, an epinephrine shot (Auvi-Q, EpiPen, others) can reduce symptoms until you get emergency treatment.

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